Cycling holidays between Passau and Vienna

Cyclists at the Danube

Passau

City view, Passau

Die MS Theodor Körner on the Danube

MS Theodor Körner, Passau

The loop of Schlögen, Danube

The loop of Schlögen, Danube

Castle Greinburg in Grein

Castle Greinburg in Grein

Benedictine abbey of Melk, Danube

 Benedictine abbey of Melk, Danube

Heldenplatz in Vienna

Heldenplatz in Vienna

From Passau - town of three rivers - to Austria's Vienna. By bike! Simples! On the well-established Danube cycle path, you cycle from one highlight to the next, along a river passing varied and beautiful countryside not to forget the riverside cultural and historic riches.

On this section of the Danube, you'll experience a world of contradictions: Imperial Vienna meets modern Linz, the old Danube Gab versus innovative hydroelectric power stations, luscious meadows and vineyards. Beginners to cycling touring and families, as well as nature lovers and athletes will love this. Between Passau and Vienna, the Danube cycle path takes you alongside the river, along level ground. And you can change sides whenever you want.

The most popular section of the Danube cycle path is between Passau and Vienna. As soon as you cross the German-Austrian border at Passau, you are welcomed to Donauleiten nature park. With a bit of luck, you'll see some of the animals and plants that live here,  because of the warm climate, helped by the Danube banks. Passing the Jochenstein cliffs, shrouded in legend, you soon reach the Trappist monastery near to Engelhartszell and the viewpoint over the wonderful Schlögen Loop. Not just know for its cake, Linz tempts visitors with cultural variety, Danube beaches and many sights. The route takes you through fields and cool woods to the magical Enns, Austria's oldest town. Between Melk and Krems is the charming Wachau, a narrow Danube valley. From Melk's Benedictine monastery and Greiner Schloss, you have a wonderful view of the Danube the Wachau vineyards. On the way to Vienna, you cycle through the rose town of Tulln, fleetingly pass Vienna Woods and visit Neuburg monastery. The crowning glory at the end of your cycling holiday is fabulous Vienna. The Austrian capital greets you with charm inviting you to visit its world-famous sights. After you have visited any of the many museums, seen St. Stephen's Cathedral, Schönbrunn Palace or Vienna's Prater, take a seat at one Vienna's traditional coffee houses. You want to cycle longer sections and spend more time in Vienna? On this version of the tour from Passau to Vienna, in 9 days, you can.

Even more speed is required for the six-day tour from Schärding via Passau to Vienna. An average of 80 km / day, you experience the Danube cycle path quickly, but no less intensively. Trips to the castle in Aschach, to Wilhering Cistercian monastery and Dürnstein Abbey with its blue and white tower are a must. People less interested in culture should take a closer look at the passing scenery: Eferdinger Becken, Studengau or the expansive river meadows of the Tullner Feld. If you have a few more days holiday, we can recommend the athletic cycling tour from Donaueschingen to Vienna. You follow the Danube, still a young river, as it gradually grows and grows into a mighty current. A good third of the tour takes you through Austria.

Back to Austrian conviviality. On the Danube Tour for Bon Vivants and Wanderers treat yourself to enough time to cycle the Danube between Passau and Vienna. From the Schlögener Blick on the impressive 180 degree turn the Danube takes here and then continue on through the fertile Machland. Take a break at one of the vineyards in Wachau. In the middle of the vineyards, these fine wines taste even finer.

The Danube cycle path classic in combination with a river cruise? Why not! With the MS Normandie from Passau to Vienna and back. Enjoy it double: While your floating hotel makes progress, you cycle from stop to stop. Take the opportunity in Mauthausen to visit the concentration camp. Visit one of the Weissenkirchen wine cellars and wander through the vineyards on the Kahlenberg looking down on Vienna.